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Table 4 Absolute and relative frequencies of social and health systems indicators as proportions of numbers of deaths, by age groups

From: Moving from medical to health systems classifications of deaths: extending verbal autopsy to collect information on the circumstances of mortality

  Recognition Access Quality of care  
Age group Doubts about the need for care Use of traditional medicine Overall costs prohibitive Did not use cellphone Did not travel to hospital/ health facility >2 h to hospital/ health facility Did not use motor transporta Problems with admissiona Problems with treatmenta Problems with medicationsa Total number of deaths n (%)
Neonate (<28 days) 2 (8.7) 3 (13.0) 3 (13.0) 13 (56.5) 13 (56.5)       23 (1.9)
Infant (1–11 months)   8 (24.2) 7 (21.2) 12 (36.4) 9 (27.3)   5 (20.8)     33 (2.8)
Under 5 (1–4 years) 3 (5.6) 8 (14.8) 10 (18.5) 25 (46.3) 20 (37.0)   5 (8.8)     54 (4.5)
Child (5–14 years)    4 (23.5) 7 (41.2) 7 (41.2)       17 (1.4)
Adult (15–49 years) 26 (4.8) 83 (15.5) 225 (41.9) 188 (35.0) 142 (26.4) 7 (1.3) 4 (1.0) 9 (2.3) 17 (4.3) 16 (4.1) 537 (44.9)
Mid-age (50–64 years) 7 (4.1) 18 (10.5) 61 (35.5) 69 (40.1) 49 (28.5)   2 (1.6) 4 (3.3) 5 (4.1) 10 (8.1) 172 (14.4)
Elder (65-84+ years) 15 (4.2) 41 (11.4) 122 (33.9) 148 (41.1) 151 (41.9)   2 (1.0) 5 (2.4) 7 (3.3) 1 (0.5) 360 (30.1)
            1196 (100.0)
Total number of indicators reported n (%) 53 (4.4) 161 (13.5) 432 (36.1) 462 (38.6) 391 (32.7) 7 (0.6) 16 (2.0) 18 (2.2) 29 (3.6) 27 (3.4)  
  1. aDenominator for the relative frequency was the number of deaths that had travelled to a hospital or health facility
  2. N.B. Respondents were able to indicate more than one social and health system indicator for each death reported. Proportional frequencies of the new indicators therefore sum to >100 %