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Table 1 Activity 1 data visualization examples and justification for inclusion

From: Optimizing data visualization for reproductive, maternal, newborn, child health, and nutrition (RMNCH&N) policymaking: data visualization preferences and interpretation capacity among decision-makers in Tanzania

Card Description of key message Type of visualization Justification
1 Comparison of proportion (part of a whole) 100% stacked bar chart People have an easier time interpreting perpendicular angles and segment lengths, so 100% stacked bar graphs are a superior option over pie charts to visualize proportion [7, 8].
2 Trend over time with target Line graph with target A line graph is the simplest way to visualize change over time and humans have an easy time judging changes in slope [7, 8, 11, 12]. Target is marked at one point to increase data-ink ratio [11].
3 Comparison of proportion Stacked bar chart People have an easier time interpreting perpendicular angles and segment lengths, so 100% stacked bar graphs are a superior option over pie charts to visualize comparisons of proportions [7, 8]. A stacked bar is one technique used to visualize results modelled by the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) [35, 36].
4 Trend over time with uncertainty Line graph with confidence interval bars A line graph is the simplest way to visualize change over time and humans have an easy time judging changes in slope [7, 8, 11, 12]. Error bands is one approach to visualize uncertainty [8, 34].
5 Geographic performance Maps Maps are used to represent geospatial data [8, 11, 12].